Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Series Update and Self Critique Ideas

Its been a whirlwind week or so and I thought you'd be interested in seeing what I've been working on in my Series....
First, I finished #4, all quilted and bound! I named it Appia (because it reminded me of old marble) andmanaged to enter it in the Sooke Fine Arts Show http://sookefinearts.com/  one of the best shows on Vancouver Island. In fact, I entered three pieces, the max allowed...keep your fingers crossed for me, please!

I'm part way through quilting #3, and I'm planning on entering it in another show here on the Island, and I'll be early for the deadline, big cheer!
The first two of the series will probably be cut up, but I've not decided yet.....I'll keep you posted.
I thought it might be useful to tell you about my self critique guidelines and perhaps you might like to use them for your work.

Guidelines for Self Critique:
  • always begin with the positive comments. We are too quick to point out flaws in our work!
  • make at least three positive comments about the piece. 
  • don't say "I like...." Begin with a phrase such as "what works well", this gives you a certain detachment and doesnt involve emotions.
  • refer to Elements of Design and use those in your critique (more info here: http://www.johnlovett.com/test.htm)
  • only after you have done the above, then discuss what doesnt work well, be objective.
  • write down your self critique, this is very important! Otherwise you could go on and on....one point of the exercise is to be short and concise.
  • you may find it easier to photograph your piece(s) and work from the photos. Plus it gives you the opportunity to crop and rotate.
  • make the changes in your work that your self critique suggests and then revisit it.
Here's a couple of sites that might help you further:
I hope this information is helpful, stay tuned for more....from my Studio!

1 comment:

Eileen Gidman said...

Great suggestions for self critique. I like the framework of using design elements to evaluate/ discuss pieces. Using photographs as you mentioned also works for me. I find that putting my work in the small format of an image on a camera or small size on a computer, I quickly can see if the composition is working. For me it is easier to identify the values within a piece.